Thursday, June 24, 2021

This Year’s Word Podcast Shownotes: Episode 5, Fill your life with experiences, not things


"Life is not just the passing of time. Life is the collection of experiences and their intensity." 

- Jim Rohn

Hello and welcome to This Year’s Word Podcast, I’m your host, Courtney Symes. I’m an author, entrepreneur, mum, and wife. In this podcast series, I will share my Word of the Year experience as I explore the meaning of the word “Love” and how you can use this word to change your life, one day at a time.

This is our fourth and final episode focusing on the Art of Self-Love, and I’ve loved sharing my thoughts and experiences on finding flow, goal setting and recognising when to quit in the last few episodes. Do yourself a favour and have a listen to these episodes when you’ve finished this one, if you haven’t already.  

In this episode, I will be talking about the joy of filling your life with experiences, not things, and how experiences can enrich your life. 


Even though I had the theme and content of this episode planned in advance, I received what I believe is confirmation from the Universe that I was on the right track, when an email from the Jim Rohn (R-own) organisation titled “What does a good life contain” dropped in to my inbox. Naturally I was intrigued, and clicked the link to learn that “A good life contains these 6 essentials”. This list consists of the six things Jim Rohn believed would constitute a good life, which included:

1. Productivity 

Where there’s productivity, there’s growth and learning. Whilst it is important to rest, rest should be seen as an opportunity to gather strength before moving onto our next project or goal. 

2. Good friends

There’s nothing like genuine friendship, but it’s ok if friendship occurs on different levels. For example, there are the friends you’ve had since childhood or share a soul-connection with. These guys know your deepest secrets, how you tick, as well as your vulnerabilities and flaws…and they still choose to hang around. Then there are the casual friends who you may have met through work or other people. Whilst you might not share a deep connection with casual friends, they still play an important role, and who knows – could become close friends over time. 

3. Your culture

Your culture encompasses where you and your family are from, as well as the elements that define your culture, such as language, music, dress and traditions. The nuances of your culture are what makes you unique as an individual – they are the essence of your soul. 

4. Spirituality 

Spirituality is our connection to source, and each other. At the heart of our spirituality lies our core beliefs and values. Spirituality can be a dedicated religious practice, or simply the deeper knowing that we are all collectively connected to something greater than ourselves.   

5. Don’t miss anything

This is my favourite of the six essentials to a good life. Jim recalls that his parents encouraged him to never miss anything – “not the game, the performance, the movie, the dance”. Jim’s father was living proof of this, when at age 93 (just before he died) Jim says, “if you were to call him at 10:30 or 11 at night, he wouldn’t be home. He was at the rodeo, he was watching the kids play softball, he was listening to the concert, he was at church—he was somewhere every night.” Jim encourages everyone to “Go to everything you possibly can. Buy a ticket to everything you possibly can. Go see everything and experience all you possibly can.” Participating in life is the best way to learn and experience as much as you can – from other people, as well as the activity itself. 

6. Your family and inner circle

They say you can’t choose your family, but I believe on a deeper, spiritual level we do choose our family. Family can support us through rough times, or help us learn important life lessons by the way they treat us, and the way we treat them. Just because you’re related by genetics or marriage, doesn’t mean you’re always going to get along. Relationships with family members can be some of the most frustrating, as well as the most rewarding. Jim says, “ If a father walks out of the house and he can still feel his daughter’s kiss on his face all day, he’s a powerful man. If a husband walks out of the house and he can still feel the imprint of his wife’s arms around his body, he’s invincible all day. It’s the special stuff with your inner circle that makes you strong and powerful and influential. So don’t miss that opportunity.”

Do these six essentials on Jim’s list resonate for you? It’s interesting to notice what isn’t on this list – the nice house, luxury car, a stylish wardrobe, or rare art collection. Whilst having enough money to avoid financial strain makes life easier, and living in a nice house can increase your quality of life, relying on material possessions becomes a slippery slope to happiness. When is enough really enough? 

A classic example of this is when I watch my kids yearn for a new toy. When they finally save up enough money to get it, or receive it for their birthday or Christmas, the happiness is fleeting. I don’t deny that possessions and material things can bring us joy and happiness by making life easier, but in comparison to the things on Jim Rohn’s list, the feeling of “happiness” is fleeting. Like an addiction, if we rely on “stuff” to fulfil us, we will always require more to fill our tank. 

The key, I believe, is to trust our senses, that is our sight, sound, smell, taste, touch, in order to help us live a full life. These five senses are a gift to help us experience life on a deeper level. However, there might be one sense in particular that you really connect with, or that helps you recall memories. For me, that is my sense of smell. I have profound memory recall when I smell something specific, such as a particular perfume. 

One of the most significant life experiences I have had with scent was meeting my husband, who, for no reason I could explain, just smelt right. 

I’m not alone when it comes to feeling attracted to someone because of their ‘scent’, one that isn’t created by an overpowering aftershave, that is. In The Scent of Desire, author Rachel Herz writes of Estelle Campenni, a psychology professor from Marywood University who recalls, "I knew I was going to marry my husband the minute I first smelled him." There are numerous studies supporting the impact our pheromones (compounds secreted by animals, including humans) have on our behaviour and physiology. Herz explains, 

"Your MHC genes determine your unique immune system and also your unique odorprint, and your odorprint is as unique as your fingerprint”. 

Therefore, it is understandable that certain people would be attracted to other people with a specific scent.

Perhaps because of my strong connect to scent, I love perfume and trying different scents. I love spending time in the perfume section at airports or in department stores where I can wander and discover new scents. I also reacquaint myself with old favourites, which evoke fond memories of the time when I wore that particular perfume. 

This happened recently when I was hanging out at a chemist waiting for a script and perused their perfume section, smelling a variety of different perfumes. I came across one that looked vaguely familiar – Charlie White.

From the first “sniff” I was transported back to summer 2000, my first summer in England. Smelling this scent was like opening a treasure chest of memories. I evocatively remembered many of the places I went and even the outfits I wore. Precious memories I hadn’t recalled for years were suddenly unlocked. While I enjoyed smelling the perfume again, I didn’t want to wear it again for fear of losing the precious memories associated with it – rediscovering it had been such a joyous experience.

Activities that engage more than one of our senses provide us with rich, memorable experiences. Some examples of multisensory experiences could include: having an aromatherapy massage or bath where you can smell the essential oils and feel the massage or warm water around you at the same time, or going for a hike in a picturesque location and feeling the path under your feet, whilst hearing birdsong and smelling the natural world around you. 

Reflect on experiences you’ve enjoyed in the past and identify the senses they have engaged. You might find there are certain experiences and senses you engage with more frequently than others, such as going to a musical or performance, or enjoying a nice meal and a glass of wine with friends. Of the experiences you recognise you enjoy, consider how you can add more of these into your life. The next time someone asks for gift ideas for your birthday or Christmas, you could suggest vouchers for experiences, such as a massage, facial, or a course or class on something you’d like to learn more about. Better still, ask them to join you in doing something you love, such as a hike with a picnic lunch. 

Make a list of the non-material things that are important to you in your life and consider how you can engage with these people or activities more often. Life is about growing and learning through trying new activities and meeting new people. So take a leaf from Jim’s father’s book and get out there and enjoy it! 

There are more tips on how to fill your life with experiences in my forthcoming book, A Year of Love: Finding peace a day at a time, and the links for the other references I have mentioned in this podcast can be found in the show notes.

I’ll leave you with today’s mantra: 

I prioritise experiences and people over material possessions and strive to live a rich and full life.  

I have recently created a free course called Magical Mornings: The secret to a productive morning routine. If the content you’ve heard in this podcast resonates with you, you’re going to LOVE this course. Magical Mornings is a subject that is very close to my heart and I'm excited to share my learnings and experiences in a course format. 

The Magical Mornings course will introduce you to a new routine that will have you jumping out of bed with new-found energy and a zest for life EVERY DAY.

The content in this course has been created from over 15 years of tried, tested and PROVEN learnings and techniques and has been my “magic bullet” for juggling family, work, exercise, personal development and everything in between.

By using this routine I have:

✅ Created four different businesses

✅ Written a book

✅ Completed courses and excelled my learning by consuming hundreds of online tutorials and videos

✅ Practiced piano

✅ Established a regular meditation practice 

✅ Exercised and run hundreds of kilometers and more...

Magical Mornings will teach you how to:

☀️ Create a Magical Morning routine that resonates with your life RIGHT NOW. 

☀️ Define what is important in your life and how you can use your Magical Morning to achieve this. 

☀️ Implement powerful self-care rituals to promote physical activity, personal development and learning, spirituality, connection with others, and organisation for the day ahead. 

☀️ Set yourself up for the day with intention, clarity and focus so you can tackle whatever comes your way with calm confidence – all before 7am!

It’s COMPLETELY FREE! 

I’d love for you to check it out at pinkplatform.thinkific.com


Tuesday, June 15, 2021

This Year’s Word Podcast Shownotes: Episode 4, When to Quit



“Persistence is a valuable strength, but sometimes it can cause you to doggedly pursue a course of action when you might be better off dropping a goal or changing direction.”

 – Cassandra Dunn, Crappy to Happy: Love What You Do

Hello and welcome to This Year’s Word Podcast, I’m your host, Courtney Symes. I’m an author, entrepreneur, mum, and wife. In this podcast series, I will share my Word of the Year experience as I explore the meaning of the word “Love” and how you can use this word to change your life, one day at a time.

This month, we have been focusing on the Art of Self-Love, and in the last couple of episodes I’ve discussed finding flow and goal setting – do yourself a favour and have a listen to these episodes when you’ve finished this one, if you haven’t already.  

In this episode, I will be talking about the controversial “Q” word – Quitting. I’ll be exploring WHY we should we quit something we’ve committed to, and WHEN is the right time to quit. 



Knowing when to “quit” was something I was challenged by throughout my Year of Love when I discovered I’d committed myself to some things that didn’t serve me well. ‘Bright, shiny’ opportunities that appeared ‘exciting’ and ‘well-timed’, gradually grew dull as they sapped my time, energy and sanity.

Throughout my childhood, I was raised in an environment where importance was placed on integrity and commitment. If I said I was going to do something, I was expected to see it through. If I couldn’t commit to something, I shouldn’t sign up, because being a “quitter” wasn’t an option. 

While I have a pretty good track record for following through on my commitments, I sometimes wonder if I’ve missed out on things by not signing up because I was fearful I wouldn’t be able to follow through. I also wonder how many things I’ve stuck with that have stressed me out and made me feel downright miserable for way too long, because I haven’t wanted to look like a quitter. 

I now recognise that my fear of other people thinking I’m a ‘quitter’ is very different to quitting itself. Each time I resist letting something go, I now know I need to also ask myself what I am afraid of. It is important to remove the fear of other people’s judgement from my decision-making process. What others think of me is none of my business, and not in the best interest for my health and well-being. 

In her book, Chillpreneur: The New Rules for Creating Success, Freedom, and Abundance on Your Terms, Denise Duffield-Thomas believes that it’s okay to quit, regardless of what others think when she writes:

“Just because you started something doesn’t mean you have to keep that idea for ever (even if your friends and family tease you for starting yet another business). Changing your mind isn’t a waste of time and energy. Especially if you realise that you’re paddling upstream, no longer love what you’re doing or, on reflection, realise that it’s no longer your zone of genius. Stop digging a deeper hole and hand in your shovel.” 



Often our decision to quit is not made any easier when we are surrounded by inspiring stories of struggle and persistence, such as Thomas Edison’s creation of the light bulb. In the book Success Habits, Napoleon Hill writes, “Mr Edison failed over 10,000 times before he finally discovered the secret of the incandescent light bulb. Can you imagine anybody going at anything and failing 10,000 times over a period of years and still sticking by it? Could you do it? Do you have any idea, my friends, how many times the average person has to fail in anything before he makes up his mind that maybe in the first place he didn’t want to do that thing, but something else? As a matter of fact, it doesn’t average one time, because 50% of the people or more quit before they start. They anticipate that they are going to fail, and they don’t even make a beginning.” 

Mel Robbins provides another wonderful example of persistence and commitment in her book, The 5 Second Rule: Transform Your Life, Work, and Confidence with Everyday Courage, when she details Picasso’s story:

“Picasso created nearly 100 masterpieces in his lifetime. But what most people don't know is that he created a total of more than 50,000 works of art … that’s two pieces of art a day. Success is a numbers game. You are not going to win if you keep telling yourself to wait. The more often that you choose courage, the more likely you'll succeed.”



With inspiring stories like these, you can understand why I have always struggled with ‘calling it’ when something isn’t working. But ultimately, when refusing to let something go begins to impact our health – physically and mentally – as well as our relationships, we need to question if this activity or commitment is still serving us. 

The key is learning how to differentiate between ‘weathering a rough patch’ vs. ‘flogging a dead horse’.

Here are some questions to consider before making the decision to quit (or not):

1. How long do you need to keep doing the thing you want to quit? Can you see the light at the end of the tunnel, or is there no end in sight? Is this short-term pain for long-term gain, or just endless, relentless pain?

2. What sacrifices are you making by not quitting? How does not quitting impact your health and your social relationships with your family and friends? Michelle Obama wisely observes, “We need to do a better job of putting ourselves higher on our own “to do” list.” 

3. Does the thing you want to quit align with your long-term goals?

4. What’s the worse that will happen if you quit?

5. What’s the best that will happen if you quit?

An episode, Quit the Wrong Thing Now on one of my favourite podcast series, The Brendon Show assured me that sometimes quitting is the best solution. In this episode, Brendon identifies three reasons to quit something, which include:

1. “Identify what makes you bored or miserable, and that which makes you come ALIVE”. If you’ve given something a red-hot crack and it still doesn’t float your boat, it’s time to move on.

2. “Think legacy”. Picture yourself at the end of your life and reflect on what you’ve done, and what you’re proud of. If this ‘thing’ doesn’t’ cut it, then it’s time to quit it.

3. “Release those who are not ready”. This point relates to the people in your life. People grow and change over time, sometimes in different directions and quitting relationships that no longer serve you is okay too.

The key, says Brendon, is to quit decisively. Own your decision and move onwards, and upwards.

Brendon also shares some excellent advice if “quitting” something requires you to choose between two or more options. In this situation, Brendon advises identifying two projects that feel equally important right now, for example, writing a book or starting a blog.  

For each project, consider the following goals and answer the questions for each option, rating your answers 1-5 (with five being the highest).

1. Being Goals – if you do this, it will develop character in your life, will make you a better person, align with your self-expression and what is unique to you and gives you self-satisfaction.

2. Connection Goals – is one better for your relationships and bringing you closer to people?

3. Creating or Giving Goals – giving or contributing is the same as creating. In order to give something, you need to creatively express yourself. You are creating something that contributes or gives to the world.

4. Growing Goals – which one of these things would genuinely stretch you? Which one is outside your current ability and will bring struggle? That is, will it force you to develop new competency, meaning, knowledge, skill, ability, confidence. Which one is really going to push you?

Brendon concludes, “The one that scores higher is going to be the one that gives you that intrinsic sense of meaning. It feels right for you to do”.

Quitting activities that no longer serve us open our lives up to new, greater opportunities. Sometimes we need make room and create the space for these opportunities by simplifying our life. As Clare Booth Luce says:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” 

I hope this episode has inspired you to examine your life closely and identify what is and isn’t serving you, as well as the confidence to edit where necessary. 

Thanks for listening, and I hope you can join me next time. 

I’ll leave you with today’s mantra:

“I edit my life ruthlessly and frequently. I am not afraid to stop doing the things that no longer serve my higher self.” 

I have recently created a free course called Magical Mornings: The secret to a productive morning routine. If the content you’ve heard in this podcast resonates with you, you’re going to LOVE this course. Magical Mornings is a subject that is very close to my heart and I'm excited to share my learnings and experiences in a course format. 

The Magical Mornings course will introduce you to a new routine that will have you jumping out of bed with new-found energy and a zest for life EVERY DAY.

The content in this course has been created from over 15 years of tried, tested and PROVEN learnings and techniques and has been my “magic bullet” for juggling family, work, exercise, personal development and everything in between.

By using this routine I have:

✅ Created four different businesses

✅ Written a book

✅ Completed courses and excelled my learning by consuming hundreds of online tutorials and videos

✅ Practiced piano

✅ Established a regular meditation practice 

✅ Exercised and run hundreds of kilometers and more...

Magical Mornings will teach you how to:

☀️ Create a Magical Morning routine that resonates with your life RIGHT NOW. 

☀️ Define what is important in your life and how you can use your Magical Morning to achieve this. 

☀️ Implement powerful self-care rituals to promote physical activity, personal development and learning, spirituality, connection with others, and organisation for the day ahead. 

☀️ Set yourself up for the day with intention, clarity and focus so you can tackle whatever comes your way with calm confidence – all before 7am!

It’s COMPLETELY FREE! 

I’d love for you to check it out at pinkplatform.thinkific.com

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

This Year’s Word Podcast Shownotes: Episode 3, The Art of Self-Love - Goal Setting



“Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life. Think of it, dream of it, live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, and every part of your body be full of that idea and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success.”

–        Swami Vivekananda

Hello and welcome to This Year’s Word Podcast, I’m your host, Courtney Symes. I’m an author, entrepreneur, mum, and wife. In this podcast series, I will share my Word of the Year experience as I explore the meaning of the word “Love” and how you can use this word to change your life, one day at a time.

This month, we have been focusing on the Art of Self-Love, and actions we can take to ‘put on our own oxygen mask first’ in our lives. In the last episode we discussed “finding flow” through activities that excite and engage us – if you haven’t listened yet, jump back to this episode when you’ve finished this one as I share some great tips.  

In this episode, I will be discussing a topic I could talk about for days – goal setting. I could dedicate an entire podcast series to goal-setting, but I’ll try offer you my top-level tips on goal setting so I can fit it into one succinct episode for you.

I have been setting annual goals for a number of years now, and believe they are vital for personal growth. Goal setting is an act of self-love, as it helps you to determine what’s important in your life. 

Here are five of the biggest lessons I’ve learned about goal setting over the last few years:

1. Goals are more than New Year’s resolutions, and can be set at any time of the year. 

2. It’s ok for goals to change – they are not set in stone, and sometimes it’s helpful to recognise a goal set previously is not serving us anymore, or has morphed into a new goal. 

3. Set your own goals, and don’t set goals for other people, because the only person we can control and change in life is ourselves. Your goals can include other people, such as “spending more time with our family or friends”, or be set in conjunction with a partner. This is particularly helpful when you’re setting financial goals together, or planning places you’d like to visit. If you are setting goals with a partner, I would recommend setting your own goals first, and then collaborating on shared goals. 

4. There is no limit to the number of goals you can set. The secret lies in defining if they are short, medium, or long-term goals. In Jim Rohn’s audiobook on Goal Setting, he challenges his listeners to make a list of 50 life goals. Sounds easy right? It’s not – try it – it’s incredibly hard! Whilst we think we want lots of things in life, when you do this exercise you’ll discover there are only a few core things you want. When you get to number 20 (or less!) this is when you have to dig deep with your goals to become super specific. 

5. Put your goals somewhere you can see them – everyday. It’s not enough to have them efficiently typed up on your computer, or neatly written in your journal. Print them out, laminate them or pop them in a plastic sleeve and stick them in your shower, on your bathroom mirror, save them on your phone screen – whatever you need to do to see them regularly at least once a day. Sir Richard Branson said he believed millionaires read their goals 1 to 17 times a day and billionaires read their goals 19 to 29 times a day. For himself, Sir Richard reads his goals on average 21 times each day. So…when did you last review your goals?

If goal setting was easy, everyone would do it. As James Clear accurately puts it in his book, Atomic Habits, “Winners and losers have the same goals.” 

So, what are some of the biggest hurdles, and how can you overcome or avoid them? 

To begin with, many people struggle with the discipline of actually sitting down and writing a list of goals. For me personally, I need to schedule time in my diary at least once a year to review my goals, update what I’ve achieved, amend current goals or set new ones. Scheduling time to do this is the key to success. I block out time to review my personal goals, as well as time to review my business goals. If I don’t have time to review both in one sitting then I split these into two sessions. 

You can also block out time to reassess your goals mid-way through the year, but I personally find I update them throughout the year when I’m looking at them every day. I keep printed out copies where I can see them, but also a soft copy on my computer that I can update when required. Depending on how big the changes are, I can then print out revised copies to refer to throughout the day. Please also note that goal setting can be done at anytime of the year – if you wait only until the beginning of the year to set new goals, you’re delaying your progress. Start TODAY!

The next challenge that many people encounter is the execution of their goals. In the case of many goals, especially the larger ones, there will be a few steps to achieving the goal. When I first set my goals, I also like to identify and plan how I’m going to work through these steps. Whilst it’s not always possible to see the entire path in front of you, you can at least identify the first three major moves you need to take to create momentum and send yourself in the right direction.  

James Clear identifies the problem many people encounter when he writes:

“Goals are good for setting a direction, but systems are best for making progress … The purpose of setting goals is to win the game. The purpose of building systems is to continue playing the game. True long-term thinking is goal-less thinking. It’s not about any single accomplishment. It is about the cycle of endless refinement and continuous improvement. Ultimately, it is your commitment to the process that will determine your progress.”



Setting the goal is only one part of the process. James believes that we are more likely to achieve our goals when we have a process in place to create positive habits. Consider what positive habits you can introduce into your life to achieve your goals. 

For example, if you want to get fit, this goal might require the commitment and discipline of getting up early four days a week to work out, because at the moment you don’t have time anywhere else in your day. When I was writing my book, I woke up early most mornings and dedicated an hour to writing. This time was reserved for writing only. If I needed to fact-check something I’d make a note and do that later in the day so I didn’t get distracted “researching” on the internet. This was important, because I found after five or ten minutes of solid writing I’d reach a state of “flow” and the words would continue to come. It was like turning on a tap and reaching a state I knew was hard to get to later in the day with the distraction of other people. 

Often, there is a reason why we haven’t been able to achieve a goal, and it’s not because we’re do lazy or don’t want it enough – we simply haven’t set up the system around us to make it possible. 

The next challenge many people face is trying to achieve too many goals at once. Don’t limit the number of goals you set, but limit the amount you try to tackle at any one time, or you won’t make progress and will feel discouraged. Some goals work harmoniously together, such as exercising and eating well, but others, such as studying and writing a book, for example, may fight for your time. If you don’t feel like you’re making progress with your goals, simply pick one to focus on, complete it, and move onto the next. Knock ‘em down one at a time!

Prioritisation of your goals will help determine what goals you should work on first. In her book, Everything is Figureoutable, Marie Forleo explains what happens when we don’t set clear goals and get distracted when she writes: 

“Every choice has a price. Everything you say yes to means you’re saying no to something else. Translation? Each time you pick up your brain-draining gadget and say YES to watching another cat video, you’re saying NOPE to ever reaching your biggest and most important long-term goals.” 

If we’re crystal clear on what we want to achieve, as well as the steps to get there, we won’t be tempted by the cat videos. 

I’m now going to share the methods I find most helpful for goal setting. 

Listening to Jim Rohn’s audiobook on goal setting many years ago was the catalyst for me to start taking goal-setting more seriously. As I touched on above, Jim challenged his listeners to write down 50 ten-year goals. The first time I wrote the list I only managed 40, and some of the goals where very small and trivial – selected just to fill a spot. Many years later, this list has now grown to over 89 items, with many ticked off along the way. 

If you’re new to goal-setting, or find the concept overwhelming, I encourage you to start with Jim’s list. 

Before you start writing your list though, Jim recommends reflecting on where you’re at in life at the moment, and thinking of five things you have accomplished that you’re proud of. These could be educational achievements, sporting achievements, adversity you’ve overcome in your life – anything in your life so far that you’re proud of. The purpose of this exercise is to prove to yourself that no matter where you’re at in life, you’ve already had some wins – you’ve got some runs on the board and are perfectly capable of achieving many more great things. 

Once you have a list of 50 items (or as many as you can), Jim instructs to go through the list and write a 1, 3, 5 or 10 next to each item. This number is the number of years in which you want to complete the goal, for example 1 is one year, 3 is three years, etc. 

Once you have done this, go through all of your one-year goals and pick the four most important ones and write down why these are important to you. You don’t need to share this with anyone, so your reasons can as personal as you like. 

Next, Jim says to consider the type of person you need to become to achieve these goals. This is a very important part of achieving your goal, so I’m going to say that again: what type of person do you need to become to achieve these goals. 

Do you need to become more curious, educated, confident? What skills do you need to develop within yourself to achieve these goals? This is part of the “system” James Clear says we need to cultivate to successfully achieve our goals.  

I aim to listen to Jim Rohn’s Goal Setting audiobook every year (I’ll put a link to this in the shownotes) as every time I listen to it I take away something different. For example, I’ve realised over the years how important it is to ask why when setting goals. If we can’t connect to the reason why we are setting a goal, what is the point of striving for it? Once we get clear on our why, we can get clear on our goals. 

Another piece of advice that jumped out when I listened to the audiobook recently was Jim’s warning: 

“Beware of what you become in pursuit of what you want.”

Beware of what you become in pursuit of what you want.



My understanding of what Jim means here is that there are sacrifices to be made when it comes to goal setting. As Marie Forleo mentioned earlier, this can be as small as forgoing another cat video. In most instances, the sacrifice is time, so what are you not spending time doing when you’re working on your goals. If that’s spending less time in front of the TV that’s probably ok, but if you’re missing out on precious time with your family or friends, tread carefully as it is a fine balance. 

Jim talks about a mentor who advised:

“Become a millionaire for what it will make of you to achieve it.”

Become a millionaire for what it will make of you to achieve it.



This statement has a similar meaning to Jim’s other exercise where we selected four of our one-year goals and considered what type of person we would need to become to achieve these goals. The main difference is that one million dollar is a large sum of money, that will require some exceptional changes to achieve. Some of the qualities you might pursue could include: knowledge, understanding of the marketplace, the ability to overcome difficult situations, problem-solving, and bringing value to the market place. What happens once you’ve achieved the million dollars? You can simply give it away, says Jim’s mentor. The money is irrelevant, because you have made changes and acquired qualities that will change your life. 

To plan my goals, I use an Excel spreadsheet with a separate tab for personal and business goals for each year, for example, Personal Goals 2021 and Business Goals 2021. All tabs are kept in one document titled ‘Goals’, so I can easily flick between tabs and refer to my goals from previous years. Reflecting on what I have achieved over the last few years is an incredibly empowering exercise.

My spreadsheet also includes a column to record the steps I’m going to take to achieve each goal. This is key, especially if the goal is a big, hairy, audacious one. I sometimes split one massive goal into a few smaller, specific ones. 

For example, ‘Get Fit’ might be broken down into:

1. run 5km x 3 times per week, 

2. weight train at the gym once a week, 

3. and swim 1km every week. 

Breaking big goals down into smaller, manageable steps makes them less overwhelming and much more achievable.   

I also ensure I print out both my business and personal goals and keep them in in multiple places so I can refer to them regularly. 

My final goal setting tip for today’s episode will encourage you to work toward your goals every.single.day. In his book, Life in Half a Second, Matthew Michalewicz suggests writing down 3 things you have done to work towards your goals each day. I incorporate this practice into my daily journal entries. You could write these are the start or end of your entry, or it could even be a complete journal entry. 

This exercise is effective because the focus is on taking small, manageable steps towards your goals every day, rather than completing them. However, take enough steps and your will you will complete your goals. 

There are more tips on goal setting in my book, A Year of Love: Finding peace a day at a time.

I’ll leave you with today’s mantra: 

I set goals in alignment with my higher self and review them regularly to ensure I stay on track. 



I have recently created a free course called Magical Mornings: The secret to a productive morning routine. If the content you’ve heard in this podcast resonates with you, you’re going to LOVE this course. Magical Mornings is a subject that is very close to my heart and I'm excited to share my learnings and experiences in a course format. 

The Magical Mornings course will introduce you to a new routine that will have you jumping out of bed with new-found energy and a zest for life EVERY DAY.

The content in this course has been created from over 15 years of tried, tested and PROVEN learnings and techniques and has been my “magic bullet” for juggling family, work, exercise, personal development and everything in between.

By using this routine I have:

✅ Created four different businesses

✅ Written a book

✅ Completed courses and excelled my learning by consuming hundreds of online tutorials and videos

✅ Practiced piano

✅ Established a regular meditation practice 

✅ Exercised and run hundreds of kilometers and more...

Magical Mornings will teach you how to:

☀️ Create a Magical Morning routine that resonates with your life RIGHT NOW. 

☀️ Define what is important in your life and how you can use your Magical Morning to achieve this. 

☀️ Implement powerful self-care rituals to promote physical activity, personal development and learning, spirituality, connection with others, and organisation for the day ahead. 

☀️ Set yourself up for the day with intention, clarity and focus so you can tackle whatever comes your way with calm confidence – all before 7am!

It’s COMPLETELY FREE! 

I’d love for you to check it out at pinkplatform.thinkific.com

Monday, May 31, 2021

This Year’s Word Podcast Shownotes: Episode 2, The Art of Self-Love - Find Your Flow



“Learning to love your whole self is the prerequisite for discovering your true nature and your reason for being alive at this time. Love is a language that all beings have in common. It is the language of the universe.” 

- Julia Plevin, The Healing Magic of Forest Bathing


Hello and welcome to This Year’s Word Podcast, I’m your host, Courtney Symes. I’m an author, entrepreneur, mum, and wife. In this podcast series, I will share my Word of the Year experience as I explore the meaning of the word “Love” and how you can use this word to change your life, one day at a time.

In the next few episodes I will be exploring the notion of “Love” by digging into a concept many people find challenging – The Art of Self-Love. 

So, what is self-love exactly? Self-love is often misconstrued as being selfish, self-absorbed, conceited and egotistical. But put simply, self-love is the act of demonstrating love for oneself by taking care of our emotional and physical well-being. Like putting on our own oxygen mask first in an aircraft, self-care is essential for our survival, as well as the way we interact with others around us. 

Self-care encompasses everything from eating healthy food, moving our bodies and getting enough sleep, to setting boundaries with our work, friends and family, as well as making time to do things we enjoy. Engaging in healthy, regular self-love practices is an act of kindness and compassion to oneself, which in turn will benefit those around us, as we won’t be showing up feeling compromised and depleted. 

In my soon to be released book, A Year of Love: Finding Peace One Day at a Time, I talk about the important role creative pursuits (such as writing, sewing, jewellery making and playing the piano) play in my life. These are all activities I enjoy doing, that give me a break from work and family life. These are also the activities I can lose hours doing, which psychologist and author Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi identifies as the concept of “flow” in his book Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

In this episode I would like to talk a bit more about the concept of Flow so you can consider how you can include more Flow activities in your own life to enhance your self-care practice. 

The first step in “finding your flow” is to identify what activities are important to you. What activities light you up, energise you, or do you become so engrossed in that you lose hours of time? If it’s been a while since you’ve made time to pursue any hobbies and you’re drawing a blank, reflect on what activities you enjoyed doing as a child. Maybe it was drawing, reading, going for a bike ride, climbing trees, or creating things with your hands. These activities don’t have to be creative, so don’t despair if drawing and painting isn’t your thing and you’d prefer to do something physical. Start making a list of these activities, because as soon as you start writing you will come up with other ideas. 

Sometimes the answer can be right in front of you in the form of an unfinished project – the idea for a novel, unused equipment, a stash of materials, unread books on your field of interest, etc. I have heaps of unfinished sewing projects that have been put ‘on hold’ because life got too busy. Some I lost interest in and will reuse the materials for a new project, but most I still feel passionate enough about to complete, and just need to make the time to do so.  

If you’re still stuck for ideas, take a walk around the shops. Bookstores in particular are wonderful sources of information, and the topics of books you are drawn to, such as cooking or gardening will give you some clues of what to pursue. 

Also consider other items you love and purchase regularly, such as clothing and accessories, home d├ęcor such as candles, cushions and furniture, handmade cakes, plants, etc. Perhaps you could learn how to make, design, cook, and grow any of the items you love to purchase.  

You can also focus on something you’ve always wanted to learn how to do, like learning a new language. Taking a course or lessons in a new activity can be another great way to introduce more “flow” in your life. You only need one idea to get started. 



When you have selected your “flow” activity, it’s time to consider the logistics, such as:

1. What materials do you need to engage in your activity? 

If you chose drawing, for example, consider what pencils and paper you will need and source these if you don’t have them already. Start with the basics and you can build on your resources once you have established a routine for your flow activity. 

2. The next step is carving out time to complete your chosen activity. 

Would you prefer to commit a little time each day, or set aside a larger chunk of time such as a couple of hours over the weekend? The key is putting a system in place to block out the time in your diary to prioritise the time for your chosen activity, otherwise the time will be easily absorbed by other activities. 

Personally, I find the quiet of the early morning hours is ideal for writing. It is also the time of day when I feel the freshest. However, I like to do activities like sewing on Sundays when I have a larger block of time to “play”, and play piano in the evening as I find this a relaxing end to my day. Realistically I don’t have time to do all these activities every day, but I feel pretty accomplished if I do one each day, or am able to dedicate a couple of hours to doing things I love each week.  

If it is challenging to carve out time in your week due to family, consider what you can do together. My children love drawing and colouring, so rather than trying to make time to do this on my own, sometimes it’s easier to do it with them. I can set them up with a couple of colouring in pages at the table while I’m also doodling or colouring in. Working alongside each other provides a wonderful opportunity for conversation, or listening to an audiobook or music together. 

One of the biggest advantages of taking a course or regular classes to learn a new interest is that you have time scheduled on a regular basis to meet with a teacher, or milestones you need to achieve which hold you accountable.  

3. The third requirement for a lot of activities is space. 

For writing I simply need a quiet, comfortable space where I can sit with my laptop. However, I enjoy sewing the most when I can spread out my patterns and fabric. The game-changer for my sewing was when I purchased a sewing cabinet from a friend and was able to leave my sewing machine set up all the time in our spare room, rather than having to take it out of the cupboard and out of its box in the cupboard every time I wanted to use it. My sewing cabinet also has compartments for all my accessories, such as thread, pins, scissors, etc., which means they are always conveniently at my finger tips and I don’t have to waste time looking for them. 

The key to finding your flow is selecting an activity that you do purely for pleasure – not to fit in with others, make money, or to enhance your career. 

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi explains this so beautifully in his book Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience when he writes:

“It is when we act freely, for the sake of the action itself rather than for ulterior motives, that we learn to become more than what we were. When we choose a goal and invest ourselves in it to the limits of concentration, whatever we do will be enjoyable. And once we have tasted this joy, we will redouble our efforts to taste it again. This is the way the self grows.”

The benefits of a new hobby or leisure activity may certainly lead to meeting new people, or discovering that people want to buy what you make - and even turn what you love doing into a side hustle. However, to get the most out of your selected activity it is best to start for pleasure’s sake only, because this removes many of the pressures that can make an activity unenjoyable.

I would also encourage you to identify the core skills of the activities you love doing, such as creativity, problem solving, improving your physical strength and stamina, teaching someone, or learning something. Once you have identified common skills behind the activities you enjoy doing, you can seek out new activities that share these skills. 

Remember there is no harm in trying something new – the worst that will happen is that you will learn something and meet some new people.  

I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s episode on self-love, and finding activities that help you reach a state of “flow”. I’ve shared a few activities that help me reach my state of flow, which may give you some ideas too.  

I’ll leave you with today’s mantra: 

I practice self-care on a regular basis and seek activities that connect with my higher self and allow me to experience a state of “flow”. 

I have recently created a free course called Magical Mornings: The secret to a productive morning routine. If the content you’ve heard in this podcast resonates with you, you’re going to LOVE this course. Magical Mornings is a subject that is very close to my heart and I'm excited to share my learnings and experiences in a course format. 

The Magical Mornings course will introduce you to a new routine that will have you jumping out of bed with new-found energy and a zest for life EVERY DAY.

The content in this course has been created from over 15 years of tried, tested and PROVEN learnings and techniques and has been my “magic bullet” for juggling family, work, exercise, personal development and everything in between.

By using this routine I have:

✅ Created four different businesses

✅ Written a book

✅ Completed courses and excelled my learning by consuming hundreds of online tutorials and videos

✅ Practiced piano

✅ Established a regular meditation practice 

✅ Exercised and run hundreds of kilometers and more...

Magical Mornings will teach you how to:

☀️ Create a Magical Morning routine that resonates with your life RIGHT NOW. 

☀️ Define what is important in your life and how you can use your Magical Morning to achieve this. 

☀️ Implement powerful self-care rituals to promote physical activity, personal development and learning, spirituality, connection with others, and organisation for the day ahead. 

☀️ Set yourself up for the day with intention, clarity and focus so you can tackle whatever comes your way with calm confidence – all before 7am!

It’s COMPLETELY FREE! 

I’d love for you to check it out at pinkplatform.thinkific.com


Friday, May 21, 2021

This Year's Word Podcast Shownotes: Episode 1, The Journey Begins



 “There is no greater power in the Universe than the power of love. The feeling of love is the highest frequency you can emit. If you could wrap every thought in love, if you could love everything and everyone, your life would be transformed.”

― Rhonda Byrne, The Secret

Hello and welcome to This Year’s Word Podcast, I’m your host, Courtney Symes. I’m an author, entrepreneur, mum, and wife. In this podcast series, I will share my Word of the Year experience as I explore the meaning of the word “Love” and how you can use this word to change your life, one day at a time.

In this episode I unpack why I chose “Love” as my Word of the year, how I choose my words of the year, as well as how I maximise my Word of the Year experience. 

I am a huge advocate of goal setting, and have set goals for a number of years. However, my Word of the Year has super-charged my goals by helping me create a new level of focus and intention. 

When I selected “dare” as my first Word of the Year, I had decided I wanted to resume work outside the home after being at home for a couple of years with my children. I then found a job that would challenge me so I could grow. Likewise, when I received the opportunity to teach night classes, rather than questioning if I was adding too much to my life at once, I jumped at the chance. My intention for the year was to go all-in and give it everything I had to see how far I could extend myself.

The following year, my Word of the Year was “Simplify”, which resonated with my desire to declutter and simplify my surroundings, as well as streamline my processes and commitments. I had been working for a year, and realised how precious time was – especially with my family. This year was focused on maximising what little time I had by “clutter-clearing” all parts of my life. This included revaluating my social life and friendships by limiting time with energy vampires and prioritising time with people who brought out the best in me, and vice versa. This word also offered an excellent opportunity to reconsider some of the opportunities I had taken on the previous year that now didn’t serve my higher self.

My Word of the Year in 2019 was love.

Even though my Year of Love took place two years ago, the experiences I had and the lessons I learned are more relevant today than ever. While it has been important to hold onto Love throughout the global pandemic, this word never grows old. Love in all its forms is eternal, and will continue to serve us throughout AND after this pandemic.

An intense and busy period in my life, where I was trying to juggle work, family time and other commitments led me to question the point of it all. On many occasions when I stopped and reflected - which I admit wasn’t as often as it should have been - I realised I was busy for the sake of being busy. Days, weeks, months and years were slipping away right in front of me and I seldom took the time to reflect and appreciate life. Sound familiar?

I had been aiming for “perfection”, but life was far from “perfect”, and when I really thought about it, I didn’t want it to be, but I did want to feel that I was the driver of my life, and not the passenger.

I contemplated, read a bunch of books, and contemplated some more. When I removed all the superficial, material “stuff and things” from the equation, love was the only thing that remained. 

I’m not the first person to reach this conclusion, and my realisation was certainly influenced by the experience and writings of renowned authors such as Neale Donald Walsch, Marianne Williams, and Matt Kahn, among others. However, everything I was reading and feeling suddenly clicked and made sense. I decided if I focused on “Love” - in all its forms - for a year, the best case scenario was that life would improve, or at the very least have a deeper meaning.

Two years on, I still continue many of the love practices I learnt that year on a daily basis. In fact, the benefits of this year were so profound that I wrote a book about my experience, which will be published this year.

The intention of writing my book was to create a gift of love for anyone who felt like I did before embarking on my Year of Love: restless, lost, confused, scared, or uncertain about the path they are travelling on through life. The book and this podcast is for anyone who has ever thought they are not enough for their family, friends, work, society, or most importantly, themselves.

I deemed first two Word of the Year experiences successful. As I reviewed my journals at the end of both years, I noted positive change and growth in my life throughout the year, and new healthy habits that had formed as a result of my Words of the Year. However, I really wanted to immerse myself in my Year of Love, so much so I would be able to recall what I did and experienced so I could write about it and share with others - before the idea of a book was conceived.

This is how I went about it. I have kept a daily journal for a number of years, and was confident I could use this habit to get the most from my Year of Love.

My Love Project simply started with a journal entry prompt each day:

“Today I showed Love by…”

I naively thought this would be an easy task. Some days WERE easy – I was the attentive mother and wife and “kicked goals” at work. I managed to tick everything off my To-Do list and was on a productivity high.

Aaaaaand other days fell apart.

The most interesting observation was that whilst I felt good on the easy days, I felt the most accomplishment on the tough days. These were the days when I had to push through challenges - exhaustion, cranky kids, etc. When I pushed myself to show love on these days I felt like I had grown. These acts of love ranged from reading a book with my kids, when all I wanted to do was go to sleep, or going for run when I would rather have vegged out on the couch with a glass of wine (there were plenty of those days too!).

The interesting thing was, the easy days were just that – easy. But getting through the tough days while still feeling like I had shown love in some way – no matter how small – was where I found the accomplishment and growth. Despite exhaustion, frustration, and the overwhelming feeling of “I can’t be bothered”, when I coaxed myself to show one small act of love to myself or someone else, like reading a book to my kids, taking a long hot bath, or going for a run, I felt better. Even the smallest act was worth it.

So, how do you choose your Word of the Year? Choosing and honouring one word for an entire year can seem like a tall order. However, it’s not as hard as you’d imagine when you use your intuition. The word you choose can be a word that motivates and inspires you. It can be a regularly used word from your vocabulary, or it can be a word that keeps appearing in your life, as my words did. Each of the words I selected were words that kept appearing in the books I was reading, the podcasts I was listening to, or would simply present themselves in my consciousness. 

As I tune into the language and words that surround me, I am presented with an abundance of words that I may or may not choose as my word of the year in other years. The word that ‘makes the cut’ is the word that resonates the most with what is going on in my life at the time, and therefore will be the most helpful in my current life chapter. 

Brainstorming is also another effective way to identify words for your Word of the Year project. You can write a list, or use the trusty traditional mind mapping template so you can expand your ideas. I often find writing ideas down helps to crystallise them in my mind, sparking new ideas once the initial idea has been captured. 

Once you have selected your Word of the Year, the next challenge in remaining focused on it for an entire year. I had my first two Words of the Year engraved on a heart charm and attached to a charm bracelet I worn every day. This did help me remember my words, but not put them into practice. Them the charms fell off the bracelet and I was back to square one. Since a tattoo was out of the question, I turned to my journal. 

I have been journaling since I was a child – almost everyday since I was a teenager. I find a journal a therapeutic way of debriefing at the end of the day – it’s a bit like my security blanky. I miss entries on some days, and find it challenging to write when I’ve had a ‘bad day’. I’d rather just go to sleep and forget about the cringe-worthy moments , but these are the days I get the most out of writing – especially when I look back at the end of the year and see what lessons I’ve learned and how much I’ve grown. 

My diary become an instrumental tool for maximising the benefits from my Word of the Year by creating a daily focus and positive habit. As I mentioned above, simply starting each journal entry with “Today I showed Love by…” was a game-changer. 

This small tweak to my daily diary entries prompted me to reflect on my day through a Love Lens. 

Suddenly the way I thought about my day completely changed. Instead of focusing on the negative, annoying occurrences, I was seeking out the precious moments of kindness, stillness, and peace – the golden moments that were like rays of sunshine breaking through clouds on an overcast day. 

If you’re new to journaling, here are some of my top tips for starting a journal:

1. Smaller is better. The times when I’ve struggled to keep a journal have been when I’ve used a large A4-sized journal with so.much.space. A blank page of this size fees too overwhelming, especially on the days when you’ve got nothing left. I use an A5 sized journal or smaller – it’s less overwhelming to write in regularly and portable when I’m away from home. 

2. Invest in a new diary every year. I’ve purchased some beautiful thick journals previously…and never finished them. There is a fun novelty in selecting a new journal each year, and I can select a theme that resonates with where I’m at in life. I’ve had health and exercise journals, gardening journals, flower journals, cosmic journals, inspiration journals with quotes – you name it, I’ve had it in journal form. Despite the theme, the one thing they’ve all had in common is enough space to write every day. 

3. Use a dated diary. I purchase a diary with a page or section for each day of the year. This will help hold you accountable on the days you don’t feel like writing as you won’t want to see blank sections. There are plenty of ‘evergreen’ journals, such as 365 day diaries available now without the specific date, so you can start them any time throughout the year.  

4. Less is best. I believe writing a sentence a day is more valuable than a page at the end of the week. Writing every day helps to capture the minute details and emotions that are harder to recall as time passes. Sure, a weekly summary is a helpful way to capture lessons learned throughout the week, but a weekly or monthly summary is more effective when comprised after reviewing daily entries. This is one reason why bullet journaling has become popular style of journaling. Simply writing a list of things you are grateful for or that made you smile throughout the day is more achievable than an essay-style synopsis of your day. Like meditation, a little bit regularly is better than a lot infrequently. 

5. Write quickly. I like to write my journal entries as quickly as I can, because I write more intuitively and honestly this way. Don’t worry about spelling or punctuation – there are no literary awards at stake here. Author Julia Cameron created a journaling technique known as Morning Pages, which utilises stream of consciousness writing – basically a brain dump of anything that crosses your mind. 

6. Pick your time. Establish a time of day when you are most likely to journal. I like to journal just before bed, as I find it a relaxing part of my night time routine. However, others like to journal first thing in the morning so they can clear their head before starting their day. When you journal is a personal choice and there is no right or wrong answer. 

7. Review. I have only started reviewing my journal entries since I started my Word of the Year project. The biggest realisation I have had since doing this is how much knowledge and growth occurs in a year. I schedule time at the beginning of the year when I do my goal-setting to also review my previous years’ journal. I make note on the lessons I learned and challenges I faced. This review also helps me recognise the areas I need to continue working on in my life (such as patience), so I can identify new opportunities for growth in the goals I set myself for the year ahead.  

So there you have it – my blue print for initiating a Word of the Year project that anyone can do. (recorded this sentence)

I’ve shared my previous Words of the Year - Dare, Simplify and Love, as well as how these words have helped to transform my life one day at a time by focusing my attention on my goals – big and small. I’ve also shared by journaling practice, which is my secret for success when it comes to getting ‘bang for buck’ out of my Word of the Year practice.  

I have recently created a free course called Magical Mornings: The secret to a productive morning routine. If the content you’ve heard in this podcast resonates with you, you’re going to LOVE this course. Magical Mornings is a subject that is very close to my heart and I'm excited to share my learnings and experiences in a course format. 

The Magical Mornings course will introduce you to a new routine that will have you jumping out of bed with new-found energy and a zest for life EVERY DAY.

The content in this course has been created from over 15 years of tried, tested and PROVEN learnings and techniques and has been my “magic bullet” for juggling family, work, exercise, personal development and everything in between.

By using this routine I have:

✅ Created four different businesses

✅ Written a book

✅ Completed courses and excelled my learning by consuming hundreds of online tutorials and videos

✅ Practiced piano

✅ Established a regular meditation practice 

✅ Exercised and run hundreds of kilometers and more...

Magical Mornings will teach you how to:

☀️ Create a Magical Morning routine that resonates with your life RIGHT NOW. 

☀️ Define what is important in your life and how you can use your Magical Morning to achieve this. 

☀️ Implement powerful self-care rituals to promote physical activity, personal development and learning, spirituality, connection with others, and organisation for the day ahead. 

☀️ Set yourself up for the day with intention, clarity and focus so you can tackle whatever comes your way with calm confidence – all before 7am!

It’s COMPLETELY FREE! 

I’d love for you to check it out at pinkplatform.thinkific.com

I’d love for you to share this episode with a friend you think would benefit from listening too. Simply take a screen shot and send them a message with a link to this episode, or share on your socials.  

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe so you don’t miss the next episode, and leave a rating and review. I read all ratings and reviews, and they make all the difference in helping other people find this podcast. 

I’ll leave you with today’s mantra: 

I am true to my word, and I choose words that connect with my higher self. 

Thursday, May 20, 2021

This Year's Word Podcast Shownotes: Episode 0, Foreword


Imagine if a single word could change your life. This was a theory I wanted to test a few years ago when, instead of setting New Year’s resolutions, I selected a Word of the Year. My intention was to pick a word to signify the way I wanted to live my life throughout the year. 

My inaugural word was “Dare”. This word was significant as it was the first year I started working outside the home after having my children. Whilst I had been freelancing and working from home while my kids were babies, this new role was a bigger challenge. I would now be working three to four days a week from an office while my daughter was at preschool and my son at daycare.

In addition to my part-time day job, I also started teaching evening classes one night a week. Despite the number of changes that occurred in my life in short succession, I embraced them all confidently, in alignment with my word “dare”.

2021 marks my fifth Word of the Year, and I am so convinced this strategy works by setting up your year with intention and focus that I created this podcast to share my journey with you.

Hello and welcome to This Year’s Word Podcast, I’m your host, Courtney Symes. I’m an author, entrepreneur, mum, and wife. I can’t wait to share my Word of the Year experiences with you in this podcast series, where hopefully I’ll fulfil my ultimate dream - to motivate and inspire you to embark on your own Word of the Year journey.

The word I will be focusing on in this series is “Love”, which I believe is especially relevant at the moment given the current condition of our world. Every month I will explore a new aspect of love, such as self-love to love for our family and friends and love for nature. Each new episode will go live every Tuesday, so be sure to subscribe so you can join the journey.

In the first episode, The Journey Begins, I will unpack how I maximise my Word of the Year experience, as well as why I chose the word “Love” and why focusing on this word will change your life. I look forward to sharing this episode with you - see you there!